BA. Jewellery Design Technology

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This Jewellery Design Technology curriculum provides an overview of what you will study in each semester. This course is designed to contribute to the transformation of the Ghanaian raw material export economy into a manufacturing economy that will export quality finished products for increased foreign exchange. Most importantly, this course is instituted to pave the way for a more profitable use of Ghana’s raw and hopefully, refined gold, through skills and research development in the art of precious jewellery design and fabrication/manufacture.

Semester One

ACDT 111 Introduction to Jewellery Design (3 Credit Hours)

This course involves experimentation and practical lessons that expose students to the fact that metal is the principal material used in the making of jewellery but not an exclusive material.

The course will also entail a review the history of jewellery making throughout the world, up to the present with an indication of what the future possibilities might be. Such a review shall be conducted with some selections of traditional jewellery used by culturally distinct ethnic groups and a sampling of contemporary jewellery. Students after going through this course will be able to establish the fact that the prime source of the design is the metal’s initial form, and its inherent character, which in turn relate to the processes imposed upon it by the use of tools and techniques.

Topics to be studied include nature of jewellery, the dynamic relationship between maker, object and viewer, Jewellery as an object for visual communication, body adornment, fashion accessory and history of jewellery. The course will be delivered through

Lectures, demonstrations and hands on practical activities.

BJD 112 Workshop Practice Basics (3 Credit Hours)

This course introduces students to the relevant activities that take place in jewellery production with special emphasis on the health and safety aspects. Analysis of general workshop requirements and an “Occupational Safety and Health for Jewellers” will be conducted for all first-year students through this course.

Students will gain an understanding in jewellery workshops as means to creation either by a single individual expected to carry out all the processes in the creation of a work or as an organised workshop where equipment is duplicated for many workers each using a separate workbench and hand tools, but sharing the larger workshop tools.

Topics to be studied include but not limited to the following: Fabrication or construction environment, heating or soldering and annealing environment, acid operation or pickling environment and finishing or polishing and buffing environments.

Mode of delivery will involve lectures, demonstrations and hands on practical activities.

BJD 113 Foundations in Technical Drawing (3 Credit Hours)

This course explains why technical drawing is an effective way of communicating design concepts. It examines industry trends to show why designers, engineers and technologists today have an even greater need to master graphics communication.

Students will be introduced to the significance of graphics language and associated tools for the designer and technologist. Course contents will entail the definition of concepts and terms important to understanding technical drawing, overview of the tools, underlying principles, standards and conventions of Technical Drawing among others.

Lesson will be delivered through Lectures, observation and discussion.

BJD 114 Basic Drawing (3 Credit Hours)

This course introduces basic drawing techniques and it is designed to increase observation skills. Emphasis is placed on the fundamentals of drawing. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate various methods and their application to representational imagery. This course also impresses upon students the fact that, the knowledge and understanding gained through drawing from life, directly enhances our ability to draw from the imagination. Mode of delivery will include lectures, demonstrations, class exercises.

Assignments would be designed to explore fully, the expensive qualities of lines using such tools as; the colour pencil, charcoal pencil, technical pen and fine-tipped maker.

ACDT 115 Introduction to African Art and Culture (3 Credit Hours)

This course is designed to help students understand the society in which they live and perform. The history, practices and beliefs that make up the African society, will be explore and discussed. Students would be able to deduce at the end of this course that, African cosmological beliefs had a direct influence on artefacts developed for various religious or ceremonial functions.

The course also examines the relevance of art to life from Prehistoric to Renaissance period. Indigenous African Art is examined. Students would be introduced to art appreciation. The course will also provide a forum for the discussion of topical issues in art education in Africa, expose students to skills in vocalizing ideas, overview, developing vocabulary and approaches to Art.

Mode of delivery will include field trips, workshops, slide and film productions.

ACDT 116 Communication and Study Skills I (3 Credit Hours)

This course is designed to help students to develop effective language and study skills for their academic work; improve vocabulary, become familiar with the conventions of standard English Language usage, and develop strategies for preparing for, and taking examinations. The course also aims at equipping students with the mechanical skills for writing academic essays. Participants of this course should be able to enhance their skills for communicating effectively in an academic environment.

At the end of the course, students should be able to: demonstrate acquired study skills in the presentation of information; use appropriate language and writing style in the presentation of information; write good academic essays with appropriate documentation; and communicate effectively in the academic environment.

Course content includes but not limited to the academic discourse community, developing study skills, developing reading skills, the relationship between grammar and communication, developing writing skills and documentation. The course is highly interactive and incorporates various levels of individual and group participation.

The mode of delivery includes lecture series, individual and group assignments, and group presentations.

Semester Two

BJD 121 Experimental Jewellery Practices (3 Credit Hours)

This course is an introduction to contemporary practice and skills in Jewellery. Students will explore elements of 3-Dimensional Design in the context of contemporary jewellery-making and metal-forming. Students will experience a workshop environment including demonstrations, lectures, examples and assignments followed by group and individual critiques.

Upon completion of this course, students will have developed a basic knowledge of contemporary practice in Jewellery, have a basic understanding of the elements and organizing principles of 3- Dimensional Design as they pertain to Jewellery and metal-working as a compositional system, have an understanding of metalwork processes and the characteristics of materials. Technical contents to be studied includes metal surface treatments, separating materials, joining, riveting, soldering, basic finishing, sheet metal forming and bezel setting.

Instructional delivery will involve lectures, demonstrations and hands on practical activities.

BJD 122 Safety Workshop Practice (3 Credit Hours)

This is a laboratory course for inducting students into the safe operation of hand tools, power tools, stationary machinery, and other equipment for the fabrication and finishing of industrial jewellery design models and prototypes as well as projects or artefacts which have to be cast, electroplated, or enamelled. At the end of this course, the student would be fully aware of work safety requirements and possible health hazards existing in their craft.

Warnings against possible mechanical and material hazards will be given at various stages of the programme. The objective of ensuring total compliance would be achieved through lectures, discussions, demonstrations, and an end-of-semester examination.

Instructional demonstrations of workshop techniques are followed by “hands- on” student exercises, using a wide variety of modelling materials, including timber, plastics, and metals.

BJD 123 Orthographic and Isometric Projections (3 Credit Hours)

This course introduces the subject of orthographic, isometric and oblique projections, which are standard methods of representing engineering/technical designs.

By the of the course, students will be conversant with skills involved in Conventional practices as applied to sectional drawings as well as production of assembly drawings from detail drawings of separate parts or vice versa.

Course contents will include the creation of one, two, and three view sketches with traditional tools will be presented, First and Third Angle projections with the use of hidden detail, First and second auxiliary projection of shapes and solids.

A description of the standard practices for representing edges, curves, holes, tangencies, fillets, and rounds will also be covered.

Method of delivery will include lectures, demonstrations and hands on activities.

ACDT 124 Introduction to Computer Aided Design (3 Credit Hours)

This course introduces students to 3D modelling as an innovative approach to the visualisation process and how Computer Aided Design (CAD) is revolutionising the industry and promoting the integration of computers into the design process. Students will gain insight into the background history to the development of uniform Rational B-Splines (NURBS) as well as its characteristics and functions.

Students will also be able to explain why 3D solid modelling is becoming the standard method for developing jewellery and product designs for many industries as well as studio artists operating very small shops. Courses to be studied include: the overview of Parametric Curves, Vector and curvature, Bezier curves, B-spline curves and their significance in the contemporary jewellery and product design studio.

Lessons will be mainly delivered through lectures, demonstrations and practical activities.

ACDT 125 Communication and study Skills II (3 Credit Hours)

This course provides students with the knowledge and skills to communicate professionally on many levels including writing; speaking; conducting meetings; giving presentations and interpersonal dialogues; and using electronic media. It will also help improve students’ ability to speak and to understand spoken English through a variety of listening, pronunciation, and speaking activities.

Upon successful completion of this course, you will be able to:

  • increase their ability to communicate with intention, develop effective listening skills, practice their conversation skills to foster interactive dialogue, improve their communication skills to make effective presentations, facilitate useful meetings, and write clear communications.

Course outline will entail distinguishing and practising different intentions for communicating, identifying optimal ways to communicate in class and workplace, identifying genuine listening skills with curiosity, demonstrating their learning, understanding, and competence in regards to the learning outcomes described in this course.

Lesson would be delivered mainly through lectures, discussions and demonstrations.

Semester Three

BJD 231 Introduction to Design and Modelling (3 Credit Hours)

This course seeks to introduce students to some of the methods employed in stimulating creativity such as synectics and lateral thinking. A series of lectures and practical design projects are undertaken which combine theoretical, practical and technical skills with an understanding of the broader issues relating to contemporary, past and future trends in jewellery design and Three-Dimensional Modelling.

Students will be introduced to the key design elements and principles of visual organisation and creative strategies that inform design work.  The functional and aesthetic aspects of design is explored, explained and illustrated.

Lessons will be delivered through lectures, demonstrations and practical activities.

BJD 232 Fabrication and Finishing Basics (3 Credit Hours)

This course is an introduction to basic jewellery fabrication techniques. Emphasis will be on technical skills in the fabrication of single pieces of jewellery. Upon successful completion of this course, students will have reliably demonstrated the ability to apply basic hand fabrication techniques using various metals in the making of jewellery, identify the health and safety concerns involved in the making of jewellery, safely use and operate hand and machine tools as well as gas torches in the Jewellery & Metals studios, for the making and finishing of assigned projects, complete a series of samples and finished articles of jewellery that reflect technical and aesthetic competency as specified in project criteria.

Course content includes layout, marking and saw piercing, metal soldering, filing, polishing and buffing, making of wire and sheet using draw plates and a rolling mill. Projects may consist of Sheet metal exercises, Sheet metal jewellery, Texturing of metal, Die forming, etc.

Lessons will be delivered through lectures, demonstrations and hands on projects.

BJD 233 Alloy Calculations, Measuring and Marking (3 Credit Hours)

In this course, students will see introduced to the basic units of linear measurement – the decimal or metric system, the British and U.S measuring systems of inches and feet and the marked measuring tools used in either measuring system.

Students, by the completion of this course will be conversant with tools such as steel rules, squares, protractors ad spring dividers, callipers and the outside micrometre calliper and students taught how to read the Vernier calliper and a micrometre. Metal and wire gauge measuring tools and marking tools (centre punch, automatic centrepunch, scriber) will be introduced and students shown how to use them. The various calculations involved in the preparation and measuring of sheet metal, wire tubes and alloys will be covered in this course.

Lessons will be delivered through lectures, demonstrations and practical projects.

BJD 234 Introduction to Metallurgy (3 Credit Hours)

This course is designed to introduce students to the metallurgy fundamentals. It will involve the study of ferrous and nonferrous metals from the ore to the finished product. Instructional emphasis on metal alloys, heat treating, hard surfacing, welding techniques, forging, foundry processes, and mechanical properties of metal including hardness, machineability, and ductility.

Students will describe technical terms used in the various phases of metallurgy, from early history to classification of steel. Student will discuss ferrous and non-ferrous metals and how they are processed and used in industry; and describe mechanical and physical properties, surface treatment and heat treatment of metals. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will have reliably demonstrated the ability to identify metals and their applications to manufacturing, analyse, discuss and identify physical properties of metals, discuss the manufacturing process of steels, identify and discuss methods of hardening and hardness testing of metals, identify and determine steel classifications and demonstrate fundamental physical testing procedures of common metals.

Course content will include application of different steels and their properties to specific applications, properties of common metals (Chemical, Physical, Mechanical), Manufacturing Process (of Pig iron, Cast iron, Steel), Heat Treatment Techniques, Terminology, Applications, etc.

Lessons will be delivered through lecturers, demonstrations and practical activities.

BJD 236 3D Modelling in Computing (3 Credit Hours)

This course provides students with a broad knowledge in 3-dimensional Computer-Aided Design (CAD) and modelling with a focus on design and jewellery-specific applications. Students will learn how to use industry-leading CAD software programs such as RHINO and MATRIX, to model jewellery projects, and then create and distribute basic, industry-standard jewellery drawings.

Students will upon the completion of this course understand the power and precision of computer-aided modelling and drafting; develop the ability to construct complex 3D shapes and surface objects; be able to create 3D objects as plan view, elevations and sections; and develop awareness of jewellery drafting with a focus on industry standards.

ACDT 237 Introduction to Entrepreneurship (3 Credit Hours)

This course is an introduction to the concept of entrepreneurship. The course will cover the characteristics of and types of entrepreneurs, identifying problems and opportunities, creative problem solving, developing a viable business model and entrepreneurial ethics.

The major learning aims of the course are to develop students’ knowledge about entrepreneurship. Specifically, by the end of the course students should be able to develop an understanding of what entrepreneurship is as well as what entrepreneurship is not and determine whether they want to be entrepreneurs with their own business or corporate entrepreneurs (entrepreneur in someone else’s business), understand how to identify opportunities (problems), develop creative solutions and build a viable business model around these.

Lessons will be delivered through lectures, directed readings and discussions.  

Semester Four

BJD 241 Concept Design Modelling (3 Credit Hours)

In this course, the students will learn how to produce detailed object models and designs from system requirements; identify use cases and expand into full behavioural designs; expand the analysis into a design ready for implementation and construct designs that are reliable.

The course begins with an overview of the object-oriented analysis and design. Students will develop high sense of concept development as it pertains to jewellery design and production.

Topics to be discussed will involve experiences in visual thinking which describe the interaction of seeing, imagining and idea-sketching are discussed. The primary materials for model making, paper, clay, plaster and Styrofoam will also be discussed.

Lessons will be delivered through lectures, demonstrations and hands on practices.

BJD 242 Fabrication and Finishing Techniques (3 Credit Hours)

This course introduces contemporary jewellery practice for art and design applications for students involved in creative work for the first time. It presents the context for designing and making, introducing students to the practical and theoretical concerns of contemporary jewellery and object. The studio activity will examine a variety of materials with a focus on the technology of metal and its translation through heat into three-dimensional forms.

Contents will include the techniques of soldering, casting, cold bending and piercing by the process of sawing, boring and the removal of metal by attrition and fabrication using non-ferrous metals to translate drawn designs into finished objects, giving students the knowledge and skills necessary to undertake contemporary jewellery design projects for various applications. The chemical and physical surface cleaning processes would also be demonstrated as well as the technique of Raising and the various tools (Anvils, Stakes and Hammers) used in this process.

Method of delivery would mainly be by demonstrations and practical projects.

BJD 243 Jewellery Casting Methods (3 Credit Hours)

In this course, students will be given a brief background to the development of casting technology.

By the end of the course, students would have learnt the most common casting method for jewellery (as well as for large objects) entailing static casting or gravity pouring where the metal fills the mould cavity simply through the force of gravity.

Course content will include the study in the different mould types (reusable and expendable) and the mould materials, lost wax investment casting, its advantages and limitations, wax composition for investment casting, types of wax and wax-manipulating tools and the preparation of wax models for casting.

Mode of delivery will include lectures, demonstrations and practical projects.

BJD 244 Jewellery Surface Coating Methods (3 Credit Hours)

This course is designed to introduce students to the various coating processes and how they are applied to the making of jewellery.

The objectives of the course are to equip students with the knowledge and skills in changing the base metals surface appearance through the use of a mechanical application of precious metals, building up a surface by depositing metals through electrolytic mediums (electroplating) and synthesizing form and texture by electrochemistry.

Main topics will include the preparation of surface electroplating, the plating formulas for gold, silver and nickel, colouring of metals as surface coating process achieved through the use of heat, chemicals and electrolysis. Students will also be advised to strictly observe all safety requirements and precautions since some of the chemicals used in such metal colouring process are toxic.

Lectures, demonstrations and hands on practical activities will be the main methods of delivery.

BJD 245 Advanced Metallurgy (3 Credit Hours)

In this course students examine the basic metallurgical properties non-ferrous metals used in the making of jewellery, gold, silver, copper, and platinum and the changes that take place during cutting and welding operations.

Students by the end of the completion of this course, will develop an understanding of the problems associated with these changes and strategies on how to avoid or minimize their adverse effects. They will also be able to describe the physical and mechanical properties of various metals, name various alloying elements used in metal making and their effects, outline the types of ferrous and non-ferrous metals and their applications and explain the heating and cooling effects on a weldment brought about by welding and how these effects can be controlled.

In addition, various weld defects and faults which can occur in the shop floor environment are examined. Additional topics including heat treatment, stress relief and distortion will be discussed in depth.

Lessons will be delivered through lectures, demonstrations and practical projects.

BJD 246 Advanced Computer Applications (3 Credit Hours)

This course explores 3-dimensional modelling as it applies to jewellery design. The primary objective of this course is for each student to understand the technology used in 3-D modelling, define the most popular types of 3-D modelling software and understand how CAM information is derived from 3-D models. The course will also expose students to the benefits of combining 3-D modelling techniques with computer- aided manufacturing (CAM) capabilities to ensure that the object or product can be manufactured as modelled.

The course content will entail the creation of CAD models within the metrics of scale, proportion, and element relationships, develop CAD models within the constraints of cost, time, size, style, and manufacturing methods, distinguishing between various CAD software, including Rhino and Matrix; and various CAM methods, including 3D printing, modelling and rendering manufactural pieces of jewellery using CAD/CAM, and display them in a final CAD exhibition.

Lessons will be delivered through lecturer, demonstrations and laboratory tutorials.

BJD 247 Developing a New Venture (3 Credit Hours)

This course seeks to inculcate into the students, the zeal and how to identify, organise and start a new business in design and related areas. It provides a theoretical and practical understanding of entrepreneurship and entrepreneurial behaviour within a variety of organisational contexts.

Objective is to empower the students to start their own business and employ others through business plan development and proposal writing and extend their understanding of the foundation theories and principles of entrepreneurship. This is to ensure that, students apply entrepreneurial theory to organisational contexts thereby playing a major role in the context of national employability and development.

Topics to be studied will include identifying business opportunities, developing business ideas, commercial ventures, portfolio/serial/corporate entrepreneurship, family business, ethnic/indigenous entrepreneurship, and social entrepreneurship.

Lessons will be delivered through lectures and case study presentations.

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Semester Five

BJD 351 Advanced Designs and Modelling (3 Credit Hours)

This course is designed to give students an in-depth knowledge of the various types of models used in representing abstract ideas, words and forms through the orderly use of simplified text and images. Special emphasis will be placed on the Scale model as one of the most useful and easily understandable of all the modelling processes. Technical, aesthetic and conceptual issues will be addressed. Students learn to design and create expressive and well-crafted models by creating several three-dimensional models and scenes. Originality as well as intellectual and emotional substance are expected in the students’ work and are studied by analysing professional examples.

By the completion of the course, students will develop a thorough understanding of the technical principles of three-dimensional modelling and rendering; improve their familiarity with high-quality three-dimensional artwork, both virtual and physical; improve their ability to evaluate and critique other 3D work; and combine the expertise into making successful 3D models and scenes with a jewellery orientation.

Mode of lesson delivery will be by lectures, demonstrations and hands on activities.

BJD 352 Fabrication and Finishing Practices (3 Credit Hours)

This course covers constructing jewellery components, single and multiple-piece items involving a range of fabrication processes and techniques. Students will learn a variety of jewellery making and finishing skills including hammering, texturing, doming, shaping, soldering, embossing, chasing, casting, filigree, etc., and will have completed a piece of wearable jewellery (earrings, pendant or pin) by the end of the course.

Topics to be studied will involve multiple skills in shaping, hammering, texturing and silver soldering.

Lessons will be delivered through demonstrations and practical projects.

BJD 353 Introduction to Gemmology (3 Credit Hours)

This course deals with the elements of gemmological knowledge that are important in jewellery design, metalsmithing, gem-setting and jewellery repair, and with practices of instrumental gem identification that are necessary for persons in the jewellery trade. It will involve the study of precious, semi- precious and synthetic stones employed in modern times for jeweller making. The structure of gemstones will be illustrated and this will be used to explain the six recognized groups of crystallization systems peculiar to Gemstones.

Upon completion of this course, students will have reliably demonstrated the ability to analyse the commonly used gem materials and their characteristics and understand the gemmological identification principles useful in the jewellery arts and trades. Course content will include physical and optical characteristics of gems, hardness and physical properties, refractive index and the refractometer, colour and light, the loupe and the microscope, imitations and composites, treatment and enhancement of gemstones, synthetic gem materials, use of classification and identification references, organic and ornamental stones, etc.

Lesson will be delivered through lectures, demonstrations and practical activities.

BJD 354 Introduction to Gem Setting (3 Credit Hours)

This course is a study of the various gem setting skills necessary for bezel and claw settings for both faceted and cabochon stones. The setting of jewel clusters is covered. Various metals are used for setting purposes.

Upon completion of this course, students will have reliably demonstrated the ability to fabricate bezels, crown, prong and claw settings for use in the setting of faceted and cabochon stones, differentiate between the types and styles of settings to maximize the effects of the stones and compare the different working characteristics of gems and stones in settings.

Course content will include bezel set cabochon and facetted stones, the making of bezel, crown, claw and prong settings suitable for the setting of facetted and cabochon stones, bead setting and the working characteristics and properties of gems and stones as they relate to setting.

Lesson will be delivered through lectures, demonstrations, experimentations and practical activities.

BJD 355 Seminar in Jewellery Design (3 Credit Hours)

This course is designed to help students to focus on the ideas and issues in the field of contemporary Jewellery Design. It addresses concerns of 21st century jewellery designers which are meant to enable students to understand concepts, visual and material culture, and make aesthetic judgments.  

At the end of the course, students will be able to analyse, imagine, question, and examine products of jewellery design; explore originality and develop fluency, flexibility, and capacity to redefine, recognize, abstract, and evaluate; and build up research, writing and presentation skills while analysing visual cultural products within the field of jewellery design.

The mode of delivery involves lectures and demonstrations; reading assignments; presentations; educational trip to jewellery industries and; examination.

ACDT 356 Business Management and Sustenance (3 Credit Hours)

This section is designed to assist students in understanding the benefits in managing and sustaining business. This in order will help students to take control of their businesses.

At the end of this course, students will acquire general management skill that will help them to organise physical and financial resources needed to run a venture. They will also acquire skills that will help them to sustain their businesses.

Topics to be treated include, Accounting and finance, business communication, Human resource management, marketing management, operations management, planning for growth and ICT (E-Commerce for small enterprise development).

Lessons will be delivered through lectures, group projects and case study presentations.

Semester Six

BJD 361 Practical Design and Modelling Processes (3 Credit Hours)

This course is designed to help the student settle on a definite design that may be modelled physically and followed through to final execution.

By the completion of this course students will be conversant with the methods of construction or fabrication as essential factors in the choice of material, manifesting in their selected projects. Students will learn to develop jewellery designs that can be classified as either frontal, cylindrical or three-dimensional.

They will also learn design processes that ensure that functional considerations such as jewellery size, weight balance, flexibility and rigidity have been applied during the analysis stage of the design process.

Lessons will be delivered through demonstrations and practical projects.

BJD 362 Fabrications and Model Making (3 Credit Hours)

This course guides students into successfully translations of simple and complex modelled objects or articles into models which may serve as a prototype for final functional. In this course, Students will refine their skills and work in more complex ways with metals.

Courses to be studied will be made up of instruction in the design, modelling and creation of various jewellery artefacts. Students will through demonstrations and hands on practical activities gain hands-on experience in welding metals and working with gems including advanced instructions on how to make moulds and models for large-scale production.

BJD 363 Jewellery Production (3 Credit Hours)

This course is a continuation of BJD 243 and introduces students to centrifugal casting. It entails a comprehensive investigation of the materials and methods of production casting. Emphasis will be on accurate model making and the production of multiple items of jewellery suitable for manufacture.

Upon successful completion of this course, students will have reliably demonstrated the ability to apply casting techniques in the production of jewellery, apply the health and safety procedures necessary for the casting process, safely use and operate the hand and machine tools necessary for the casting and finishing of assigned projects, complete a series of samples and finished articles of jewellery that reflect technical and aesthetic competency as specified in project criteria and recall the characteristics and properties of metals and materials used in the casting of jewellery.

Content of the course will include skills in the various processes involved in casting such as: spruing of the wax model, determining the amount of metal needed for a casting, painting the model with a wetting agent, preparing the casting metal and finishing the casting.

BJD 364 Advanced Gemmology (3 Credit Hours)

This course continues what was started in BJD 354 and has two objectives. The first is to introduce students to cabochon-cut stones which are probably in wider cut types. They can be purchased ready-cut in a great variety of different stones, shapes and standard dimensions. The second is to introduce students to faceted stones which have surfaces that are cut into a systematic made in relation to the crystal of the particular stone.

By the end of this course students will have a good appreciation of the prime function of facets on a stone to exploit its optical properties of brilliances, dispersion of fire, and to heighten any existing colour.

Topics will include occurrence of gemstones in nature, gemstone enhancement techniques, and synthetic gem materials.

An instructional procedure includes a comprehensive lab component that will give student the opportunity to acquire some basic hands-on experience in gem identification using gemmological instruments (refractometer, dichroscope, etc.)

BJD 365 General Gem Setting Techniques (3 Credit Hours)

Many systems of fabricating a setting for cabochon-cut stone are used. The basic types were explained and demonstrated in BJD 354. 

In this course, students are introduced to the three primary settings used for setting a faceted stone, namely, Closed settings – the stone is normally only open to light from above the girdle, Open settings – this allows the entrance of light stone from below a transparent, faceted stone’s  girdle through the pavilion facets and Group settings – those in which several stones are set together to form a cluster; to cover a surface , called a pave’ setting; or in a linear series, called a channel setting this course will close out  with a brief discussion on composite stones an gemstone substitutes.

Mode of delivery will include lectures, demonstrations and practical sessions.

ACDT 366 Ethical and legal Issues in Jewellery (3 Credit Hours)

This course seeks to introduce students to the ethical and legal issues of business in Ghana.  It provides a theoretical and practical understanding of ethical and legal related issues that affect businesses in Ghana. It also explains the driving forces of new venture success and understand the ethical and legitimacy challenges that face entrepreneurs with new ventures.

Objective is to inculcate into the student the concept of business ethics that propels genuine and rewarding entrepreneurial practices. Students by the completion of this course will be able to exhibit understanding of rules and ethical issues that promote not just entrepreneurial practices but develops the kind of entrepreneurial spirit that ensures individual profitability and national development.

Topics to be studied will include business organisation in Ghana, custom duty, environmental legislation, investment in Ghana, labour laws and labour acts, taxation and tax legislation, procurement act, civil procedure.

Lessons will be delivered through lectures, demonstrations and presentations.

ACDT 367 Research Methods (3 Credit Hours)

This course seeks to provide an introduction to research methods and designs relevant to Jewellery practitioners.

The course will focus on an introduction to various research designs, including experimental and non-experimental, as well as quantitative and qualitative research methods. In addition, the course will focus on providing a practical understanding of several statistical tools used in Artistic research.

The emphasis will be on knowing when to use the various tests, what they measure, and how to interpret results. Students will understand some basic concepts of research and its methodologies and identify appropriate research topics.

Again, students will be able to select and define appropriate research problems and parameters, organize and conduct research (advanced project) in a more appropriate manner, and write a research proposal and research report.

Semester Seven

Lecturer taking an International student through jewellery making lessons

Attachment in Industry

The Industrial Attachment programme is intended to expose students to industrial practices in Jewellery through attachment to Jewellery firms. This intends to foster the ability to apply the previously learned methods and techniques and adapt them to the organizational dynamics and it facilitates the entry into professional life and the integration of the knowledge obtained in previous courses, and adds a learning experience in diversified management areas such as human resources, finance and marketing.

Assessment is based on an appraisal of students’ performance in industry as indicated by supervisors of place of attachment, and lecturers who will visit students at the place of attachment and will be according to the rubrics outlined

BJD 471 Host Entity Evaluation Reports (9 Credit Hours)

After completion of the Curricular Internship course students should have acquired the context of and within the company / organization (Host Entity). Student’s industry supervisor who oversees student’s day-to-day work will provide assessment of performance during the period of attachment. Faculty visits to the various host companies will be carried out by academic staff to interact with students and company staff on a monthly basis.

The scheduled continuous assessment of interactions during visits will form the basis of field assessment by faculty.

BJD 472 Industrial Project Work (6 Credit Hours)

Under this module, students will be expected to prepare bi-weekly reports of activities. These reports will culminate in a final report to be submitted at the end of the attachment period to the college.

Semester Eight

BJD 481 Post Industrial Attachment Seminars (3 Credit Hours)

The course aims to make students think about their experiences whilst on industrial attachment in terms of appropriate and inappropriate conducts and actions. It also creates opportunities for students to reflect on what they have learnt whilst on industrial attachment and what they still need to learn. Presentation and discussion of reports that detail and appraise the overall experience of students as interns. Students are also able to reflect on problems and opportunities in the Jewellery Industry based on their experiences whilst on industrial attachment.

It gives students the platform to enhance their understanding of how their industrial attachment experience fits into current practice and thinking within the design industry in Ghana and beyond.

Lessons will be delivered through lectures, discussion, oral and written presentations.

BJD 482 Studio Research in Jewellery Design (3 Credit Hours)

This is a studio-based course is designed to assist students to focus on the real world demands of the Jewellery industry. An important element of the course is work-based learning that seeks to link up classroom activities with a real world of work experiences gained through the Industrial Attachment Programme (IAP). 

It aims at equipping students with an underpinning knowledge of professional practice from which to develop individual skills requisite for an increasing technologically demanding yet creative environment experienced so far. Projects accomplished in this course are expected to serve as innovative, highly creative, cross- disciplinary tools responsive to the true needs of men and would be executed using a variety of techniques.

Upon Completion of this course, students will demonstrate sensitivity to and competences in the identification of Jewellery design needs through research; identify their own competences within the broader context of Jewellery Design praxis and demonstrate their application to the solution of real time Jewellery design problems.

Lessons will be delivered through lectures, discussions, oral and written presentations.

BJD 483 Jewellery Exhibition and Portfolio (3 Credit Hours)

The course would involve a series of presentations of a purposeful collection of students’ work that exhibit their efforts, progress, and achievements during their four-year study of this programme.

Upon Completion of this course, students will understand the essence of self-directed out-of-classroom learning, gain a broader view of what is learned, demonstrate progress toward identified outcomes, create an intersection for classroom instruction and industrial practices, identify ways of valuing themselves as learners and identify opportunities for peer-supported growth. The course ensures that individual students presentations represent a collection of his/her best works or best efforts as well as selected samples of Jewellery Design products and work experiences.

Individual student’s presentations are exhibited in an allocated space for public viewing, appreciation and assessment.

BJD 484 Project Management in Jewellery Design (3 Credit Hours)

The course seeks to expose students to the knowledge and information about practices in the design, production workshop and project management in the design industry. The study is also intended for students to acquire a thoughtful, orderly, quality-conscious, cost beneficial approach to industrial production. Ethical and professional behaviour in organizational project management are major issues to deal with in any book publication.

Topics to be treated are Management defined; Management Principles/function; Concept Development/Design; Managing jewellery materials resources; Estimation and Costing; Productivity and Quality Control; and Book-keeping procedures.

Methods to be used in delivery are lecturers, seminars, resource person presentations, discussions, reading assignments, and project/practical activity.

BJD 485 Project Work (3 Credit Hours)

This course is designed to offer students understanding and application of some basic concepts of research and its methodologies and identify appropriate research topics.

Again, students will be able to select and define appropriate research problems and parameters, organize and conduct research (advanced project) in a more appropriate manner, and write a research proposal and research report.

Mode of delivery is student led with guidance by the supervisor.

BJD 486 Accounting and Finance for Entrepreneurs (3 Credit Hours)

This course is designed to deepen knowledge on all the components of the balance sheet, using a double entry booking method. By the end of the course, students are expected to be able to analyse a company’s financial statement and come to a reasoned conclusion about the financial situation of a company.

This course will be delivered through presentations. In addition to some assignments that will be solved in class, the course will be finalised with real life case analysis. The purpose of the chosen case selected is to illustrate how various financial accounting concepts affect the decisions on real-world problems.

ACDT 357 Operations Management (3 Credit Hours)

This course seeks to address the key operations and logistical issues in service and manufacturing organizations that have strategic as well as tactical implications. Aside the problems and opportunities encountered by managers in contemporary production and operations management, this course will attempt to identify and understand those factors which influence the design and effective operating systems of the firm and its management in a global context.

This course will be delivered through lectures, and team work in the form of executive briefings to the class and also by collaboration on exercises during class periods.

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Our Vision

The vision of the College is to become an internationally reputable centre for Design education and research.

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    P. O. Box AN 7675,
    Accra, Ghana.
    AsanSka House 648/4.
    Royalt Castle Road-Kokomlemle.

    • +233 (0)30 222 6719
    • +233 (0)54 012 4400
    • +233 (0)54 012 4488

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